Apr 282013
 
Me and my little brother in front of the world's tallest brick minaret.

Me and my little brother in front of the world’s tallest brick minaret.

Did you know that in 2006, more tourists visited Qutb Minar than the Taj Mahal? Though lesser-known to foreign tourists, Qutb Minar contains the tallest brick minaret in the world, and wields a hypnotic power, particularly on a misty Delhi day like the one when our India teacher tour visited.

Colin scopes out the ornate engravings.

Colin scopes out the ornate engravings.

Qutb Minar reaches 239 feet towards the sky, and was completed in 1368 AD. It is part of the multi-building Qutb Complex, with ancient buildings layered atop even older ruins to create a lasagna of history. These structures include a mosque and tombs, some of which date back to the 1100s AD.

Such intricate carvings. They are parts of the Koran.

Such intricate designs! The words display passages from the Koran.

Stunning carvings decorate the walls of the Qutb Complex. Some carvings are purely ornamental, while others display verses of the Koran in Arabic. Islamic art and architecture never fails to impress me with its brilliantly conceived patterns!

Look closely!

Look closely at the artistry.

So, is a tourist allowed to climb to the top of sky-high Qutb Minar, like we climbed to the top of the largest mosque in India on Christmas Eve? Alas no, and for a very sad reason. In 1981, there was a stampede of schoolchildren inside, and lives were lost. Since then, visitors are not allowed inside.

Dorky hide and seek amid the columns.

Dorky hide and seek amid the columns.

On a happier note, neon green birds were everywhere at Qutb Minar. How magical to see these arrows of emerald darting between the ancient walls!

There were these beautiful green birds flitting about.

There were shockingly green birds flitting about.

We wandered around the foggy complex as if in a dream, imagining the layers of history that occurred in each corner of the buildings. Staring up at Qutb Minar made our heads spin. What must it have been like to build?

A dizzying look up the minaret.

A dizzying look up the minaret.

But don’t overlook the smaller things! A hugely important historical relic in the Qutb Complex looks like, well… a boring metal tube. See the Iron Pillar of Delhi standing incongruously in the photo below? In fact, this iron pillar was erected in 402 AD and weighs over 14 THOUSAND POUNDS, making it “one of the world’s foremost metallurgical curiosities.” Indeed, I am curious. That’s crazy heavy! How is that density possible?

This metal pole is exceedingly famous.

This metal pole is exceedingly famous… and shocking.

Moving on to another section of the Qutb Complex, we see the Alai Darwaza gate: the principal gateway to the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, built in 1311 AD. In the next three photos, drink in the stunning architecture of this structure.

The stunning Alai Darwaza gate.

The gorgeous Alai Darwaza gate.

The carvings are stupendous!

The carvings inside are stupendous! Colin is in awe.

New home decorating ideas?

New home decorating ideas?

We loved our visit to the Qutb Complex, and can see why it’s right up there with the Taj Mahal as a top attraction for tourists in India. Now if we could only fit that 14,000-pound Iron Pillar of Delhi into our bags to put on our mantel…

You are amazing, Qutb Minar!

You are amazing, Qutb Minar!

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  12 Responses to “The Tallest Brick Minaret in the World: Qutb Minar, India”

  1. Beautiful pics, and thanks for reminding the world that India has got a lot more than Taj. Though not as well known as Taj, the Qutub complex is the single largest location of many Islamic dynasties including the very first the Slave dynasty in India.

  2. If my house looked like that, I would have a party every day… with my family.

  3. Great photography..!! Just love it, Qutb Minar is one of the best place to visit in India. I am thinking to go there from a year but can not get time for tour.:( Whenevr I’ll go, I’l surely go to visit this awesome place.

    • Surely do! That’s the thing about India– there will always be more un-missable sights to see than you EVER have time for!

  4. More fascinating Indian architecture!

  5. I visited this place as well! Cool that you got the chance to see it. I found Delhi had a lot more tourist attractions than I was expecting. I guess the Taj Mahal kind of dwarfs many of the others…

  6. Qutub Minar is a nice histoic place, I have been there last year in February. This place has got a lot of value in the history of India and Delhi.It was pity that we were not allowed to at the top.

  7. Looks beautiful, and I love that it’s not crowded!

  8. Greta pictures! Seville’s most popular site – and city symbol – is actually a minaret, as well! Not bad for something that was nearly demolished when the Catholic Kings came through!

  9. Oh, those carvings are incredible. i want to go!!

  10. Great Photos and great article as always Lillie! If any of your readers would like to follow in your footsteps GEEO still has room in our India/Nepal program. This trip just for teachers will take you to many of the same places we took Lillie on the custom trip we created with her this past Winter. For more information about the 20 different travel programs we are offering this summer please go to http://www.geeo.org. We at GEEO look forward to more articles from your incredible trip to India.

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